Doane Daily Cotton Commentary

Brugler Grain/Cotton/Livestock Commentary

Rice News Feed

USA Rice Federation Daily, 3-18
:
Lincoln Announces $4.5 Billion Nutrition Legislation (Read More)

Diesel and gas prices up for fourth straight week
:
Diesel average price increases 2 cents a gallon nationally (Read More)

K. Good Farm Policy 3-18
:
Budget; Climate; Biofuels; Ag Econ; Food Safety; and Animal Ag (Read More)

Texas: What is rain harvesting?
:
Course scheduled, Kerrville, April 12-13 (Read More)

K. Good's Farm Policy, 3-17
:
Budget; Climate; Ag Economy; Trade; Biofuels; and Crop Insurance (Read More)

K. Good's Farm Policy, 3-16
:
Climate; Trade; Ag Economy; Corn Production (Read More)

Rice Advocate, 3-12
:
Rice farmers speak out against current U.S. policy toward Cuba (Read More)

K.Good's Farm Policy News, 3-12
:
Trade; Climate; Ag Competition; Animal Ag (Read More)

K.Good's Farm Policy News, 3-11
:
Jobs Bill; Insurance- SURE; Competition; Climate; and Trade (Read More)

Hurricanes: AccuWeather Calls For More Active 2010 Season
:
Expect a 2010 hurricane season more like the one in 2008 than 2009. (Read More)

Diesel, gasoline prices up yet another week, 86 cents above year-ago price
:
Average U.S. diesel price running 86 cents a gallon above same period a year ago. (Read More)

K.Good's Farm Policy News, 3-10
:
FAPRI; Biofuels; Disaster Payment; Climate Change; Farm Bill; Trade. (Read More)

Fight That Urge To Plant Into Vegetation - AMS Ag Report, E-Central Louisiana
:
How does the lineup of rice herbicides really compare to other crops? (Read More)

Rice Advocate, 3-5
:
Cuban Trade and Travel, H.R. 4645 (Read More)

Bayer Cuts Ignite Price
:
Also ramps up production. (Read More)

Arkansas: Rice Research News,3-3
:
"Roy J" is new high-yield and lodge resistant variety (Read More)

Diesel prices up 3 cents a gallon, 3-3
:
Gas prices also continue to increase (Read More)

Rice Advocate, 2-26
:
Producers Applaud Introduction of Cuba Trade and Travel Bill (Read More)

East-Central Louisiana 2010 Burndown And Planting Lags
:
Ruts remain a major issue for rice farmers (Read More)

Center for Agricultural Law and Taxation (CALT), 2-8
:
The Death (for the moment) of the Federal Estate Tax. (Read More)

Center for Agricultural Law and Taxation (CALT), 2-9
:
Top Ten Agricultural Law Developments of 2009 (Read More)

Mississippi Field Notes (Central Miss.), 2-8
:
Make sure your planting seed are good.| (Read More)

Texas Rice, Winter 2009
:
Cold Tolerance at Germination and Seedling Stages in Rice. (Read More)

Rice Industry Fears Job Losses, Economic Fall-Out from Ag Budget, 2-3
:
Farmers Applaud Sen. Blanche Lincoln, Other Ag Leaders for Opposing Plan (Read More)

EXCEL: The Louisiana: Projected 2010 Rice Farm Cash Flow Model
:
A Rice Production Farm Income and Expense Producer Decision Tool (Read More)

MANUAL: The Louisiana: Projected 2010 Rice Farm Cash Flow Model
:
PDF file with instructions for using the Excel spread sheet planner (Read More)

Louisiana: Rice Research Station News, 1-29
:
Two New Clearfield Varieties for 2010; Scout for Blast Early in the Season; White Tip Nematode; Comparison of Cruiser and Dermacor Seed Treatments; Blackbird Baiting Program. (Read More)

Diesel prices drop for second week in a row
:
National average down 4 cents, less in Gulf states and California (Read More)

Liberty-Link Traits Not Found In 2009 U.S. Rice Crop
:
Contamination cost sales, disrupted trade (Read More)

Louisiana: Projected 2010 Rice Farm Cash Flow Model, 1-25
:
A Rice Production Farm Income and Expense Producer Decision Tool. (Read More)

Soybeans still in the field? Look at them as a cover crop.|
:
Mississippi Field Notes (Central Miss.), 1-24 (Read More)

Tractor sales will remain weak in 2010, says association
:
Lower commodity and farm income numbers continue to depress buying enthusiasm (Read More)

10 Questions And Answers About Liberty-Link Soybeans
:
Overview from Georgia about where they fit with Roundup resistance in Palmer pigweed (Read More)

Rice Advocate, 1-15
:
USDA Proposes Cuts to Crop Insurance in SRA Negotiations. (Read More)

Arkansas:

Recommendations after Asian soybean rust found in southeast Arkansas

Lonoke, Arkansas (September 9, 2008) – Hurricane Fay, which blew into Arkansas a couple of weeks ago, apparently left behind its calling card – Asian soybean rust in four southeast Arkansas counties, according to Dr. Scott Monfort, Arkansas Extension plant pathologist.

Monfort said the yield-robbing disease was confirmed in Ashley, Chicot, Drew and Desha counties Monday about two weeks after Hurricane Fay, the sixth storm of the 2008 Atlantic season, hit Florida.

Asian soybean rust won’t be a problem for a majority of Arkansas’ 3.2-million-acre soybean crop because it’s arriving so late in the state, Monfort noted. 

“Unfortunately, we estimate that we still have about 200,000 acres that could be impacted by soybean rust if cloudy and rainy conditions persist over the next two weeks.”

However, he said, some farmers, already hit hard by record fuel and fertilizer prices this season, will likely have to spray their crops with fungicides.

Monfort said Division of Agriculture personnel scouted Friday for the disease in the southeast part of the state “because we figured it had been two weeks after Hurricane Fay swept through panhandle of Florida, where most of the disease problem is, carried spores over to Louisiana and turned up into Arkansas.

“We figured we’d see symptoms of the disease in Arkansas about 14 days after the storm, and it’s just about right,” he said.

“We barely got nicked by the hurricane, but it’s enough,” Monfort said. He said it’s likely the disease will be found in one or two more counties in south Arkansas. “We’re looking hard for more rust,” he said.

It’s likely that Hurricane Gustav, which hit the state last week, blew in some disease spores from Louisiana, but the disease problem there was nowhere near as serious as it was in Florida’s panhandle, according to Monfort.

“Gustav will make the weather perfect for disease development,” Monfort said. The disease prefers prolonged cloudy, rainy conditions, which promotes development and spread.

Monfort urged farmers across the state, including southeast Arkansas, not to automatically spray fungicides for the disease.

Check growth stage first, he recommended. If the crop is beyond the R6 development stage, a fungicide isn’t warranted, he said. “Quite a bit of acreage down there is R6 or more, which means beans in the top four nodes of the plant are touching in the pods.

“All three producer fields where the disease was found had very low levels of active soybean rust with an estimated 1 out of 100 leaves showing symptoms, and the disease was developing slowly,” he said.

The findings could change over the next few days as scouting for the disease continues in other regions of the state and/or if Hurricane Ike visits the state.

Monfort said farmers should scout their soybeans and send in samples from suspicious fields for testing by the university.

Before applying a fungicide, he said farmers should follow these guidelines: 

1.  Are you within a couple of counties from the confirmed locations?

a.  Yes - you are a higher risk

b.  No  - you have a little more time to make a decision

2.      Have you scouted your soybeans?

3.      What growth stage are your soybeans?

a. R1 to Early R5 are at more risk

b. Mid R5 to R8 --- you will more than likely outrun yield impacts

4.       Yield potential of your soybean crop?

a.  SBR control may not be economical if Yield potential of less than 25 bushels per acre (depends on what you have in your crop to date)

5.  What fungicide/fungicide combination do I use if I need to make an application?

a.  Soybean fields that are at Growth Stage R-1 to R-4 should be sprayed with a combination of a strobilurin and a triazole fungicide.

b.  f soybeans are currently between Growth Stage late R-4 to R-6, an application of a triazole alone should be applied.

c.  See table for a list of labeled fungicides and their relative effectiveness against soybean rust.

d.  Soybean fields that are currently at or beyond Growth Stage R-6 are no longer vulnerable and should not be sprayed.

Monfort said it’s critical that farmers read and follow all fungicide labels. If farmers have questions or concerns, they should contact Monfort at (870) 659-0648, Dr. Jeremy Ross at (501) 944-0621, or Amy Carroll at (870) 258-2509.

 

Table 1. Available Fungicides for Soybeans

FUNGICIDE

TYPE

CHEMISTRY

LABELED

RATES

Quadris

P

strobilurin

YES (FULL)

6.0 – 15.5 OZ

Headline

P

strobilurin

YES (FULL)

6 – 12 OZ

Stratego

P

strob + triaz

YES (Full)

10 OZ

Folicur

P/C

triazole

YES (Full)

3 - 4 OZ

Uppercut

P/C

triazole

Section 18 Expired

3 - 4 OZ

Alto

P/C

triazole

YES (18)

(Section 3 registration in 2008)

4 OZ

Caramba

P/C

triazole

YES (18)

8.2 – 9.6 OZ

Laredo 

P/C

triazole

YES (Full)

4 – 8 OZ

Topguard

P/C

triazole

YES (18)

7.0 OZ

Domark

P/C

triazole

YES (Full)

4 – 5 OZ

Punch

P/C

triazole

YES (18)

3 – 4 OZ

ProLine

P/C

triazole

YES (Full)

2.5 – 3 OZ

Quilt

P/C

strob + triaz

YES (Full)

14 – 20.5 OZ

Stratego

P/C

strob + triaz

YES (Full)

10 OZ

Tilt

P/C

triazole

YES (18)

4 – 8 OZ

PropiMax

P/C

triazole

Not Available for SBR

4 – 8 OZ

Bumper

P/C

triazole

YES (18)

4 – 8 OZ

Bravo, Echo, Equis

P

chlorothalonil

YES

1.5 – 2.25 PTS

Headline, Quadris, and Stratego are Preventative treatment only for SBR (Underlined).

 Italicized, and Bold fungicides are Not as effective on Soybean Rust compared to other triazoles in list.

Table 2. Recommended Fungicide Mixtures for  Soybean Rust and Other Foliar Diseases

 

 

 

 

Recommended triazoles

 

 

 

 

Folicur

or

4.0 oz

 

 

 

 

Laredo

5.0 oz

 

Quadris           

6.0 oz

 

or

 

 

 

 

 

Domark

5.0 oz

 

or

 

+

or

 

 

 

 

 

Topguard

7.0 oz

 

Headline

6.0 oz

 

or

 

 

 

 

 

Punch

3.0 oz

 

 

 

 

or

 

 

 

 

 

Alto

4.0 oz

 

 

 

 

or

 

 

 

 

 

Caramba

6.1 oz

 

 

Stratego

10.0 oz

+

ProLine                    

1.0 oz

 

Quilt

14.0 oz

+

Alto

2.0 oz